Conclusion

 The Palestinian “camp” of Irbid now blends seamlessly in with the rest of the city’s urban fabric, while Circassian migrants have, over generations, become perfectly integrated to Jordan. Do these historical cases tell us anything about the future of Syrians’  de facto  integration?

The Palestinian “camp” of Irbid now blends seamlessly in with the rest of the city’s urban fabric, while Circassian migrants have, over generations, become perfectly integrated to Jordan. Do these historical cases tell us anything about the future of Syrians’ de facto integration?

 
 

One Syrian’s Experience

Leaving Irbid

In October 2013 I [Agyead] decided to move to Jerash from Irbid due to proximity to the university and the lower cost of housing.[1] I also found a home formerly rented by Syrian students at the university, and this made the move there very easy. Just like I was welcomed by the Jordanians in Irbid, I was also welcomed in Jerash after I moved to it.

After briefly returning to Irbid, I left again to find better work with a journalism company in Amman where I have stayed ever since. The cost of living is higher, but there are more job prospects to make up for this.

I never really intended to leave Jordan, but increasingly I have begun to look for an opportunity to travel elsewhere. This is largely because of the poor labor market here and the frequent exposure to exploitation in workplace and hate speech directed against Syrian refugees. The problem of underemployment is especially bad for Syrians with university degrees. The lack of job prospects and the constant discrimination makes me mentally and physically unstable, and this instability is aggravated by the constant fear of the near and distant future. Underlying it all, the ongoing war in Syria and the fear of persecution remains with me as long as the current regime is in place.